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Exercise and thelogical musings - John [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
John

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Exercise and thelogical musings [Jun. 6th, 2007|11:46 pm]
John
So... 5:15 running (well, jogging), and 2 minutes walking, five times before I had to extend my rests. 4:46 miles in an hour. Both of these are new personal bests, and I haven't had any exhaustion as a result.

Theologically, I had a strange thought yesterday.

The Garden of Eden story - Adam and Eve are in a place like paradise, right? And yet, they don't have knowledge of good and evil.

What does this mean? What could it mean?

A long time back, I realized that there is no requirement for evil... you could theorize about a world that had goodness without evil. It wouldn't happen in this world, but logically speaking, if people could not be harmed by others, well, the concept of evil wouldn't really make any sense. What would make a person evil if they couldn't hurt anyone? It's also possible that people couldn't really *help* each other, as well, and "good" wouldn't make much sense, either.

They would not have knowledge of good and evil without the possibility of suffering.

What if the tree, whether physical or metaphor, is what actually made them alive? What if the story is actually an allegory for spirits choosing to enter the "real world"? What if the entire idea of the story was not that there was some great disobedience separating them from God, but a choice to become flesh?

What if it's actually describing something akin to the Buddhist idea that it is this life that creates suffering, that leaves us bound by suffering? It is in the spirit that our true happiness can be found, and the things of this body, of this earth, leave us removed from happiness?

It's a complicated thought, but it also raises some interesting ideas. (Well, interesting to me, at least.)
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: ljgeoff
2007-06-07 11:51 am (UTC)
What if the tree, whether physical or metaphor, is what actually made them alive? What if the story is actually an allegory for spirits choosing to enter the "real world"? What if the entire idea of the story was not that there was some great disobedience separating them from God, but a choice to become flesh?

This is how I've always seen the creation story. But I see most of the stories in the bible as parables for spiritual "action". A friend of mine who was a Unity minister once said, "We are all spiritual beings who have chosen to experience a physical reality."
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[User Picture]From: eleccham
2007-06-07 11:15 pm (UTC)
Interesting, indeed!
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[User Picture]From: ms_interpret
2007-06-07 11:25 pm (UTC)
What a wonderfully fascinating idea. Thank you!
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[User Picture]From: laurarey
2007-06-08 11:37 pm (UTC)
Just to add to the fun....

Remember the snake? He sure got a bum deal. Everyone loves to hate the snake. What did the snake do? He told the truth.

I, personally, like the snake. he questions things. He makes you reconsider your options. He causes you to re-evaluate your position on things.

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